Instagram Email me!
I wrote a book! If you've ever wanted to learn a bit more about creating recipes, this series is designed for you. The first book focuses on cookies, because who doesn't love cookies?
Available now on Kindle.

Wednesday, 20 April 2011

Framing Ruins




I've always loved ruins. If you were to ask my parents, they'd tell you that I've always strongly preferred English Heritage properties (typically falling down) to nicely-preserved National Trust houses.

I think it's partly about letting my imagination take over, but one part of what I love about ruined buildings - especially large ones - is the range of options for framing scenes. Windowless windows, door-free doorframes, and tumble-down walls all provide interesting outlines for beautiful pictures.


In Derbyshire this weekend, we enjoyed visits to two different English Heritage houses - Sutton Scarsdale Hall and Bolsover Castle - which both have significant ruins. I'll post a little more detail shortly, but for now, here's a selection of fun framing shots.













14 comments:

Yenta Mary said...

Oh, ruins have so much history and character! There is beauty in their skeletons. They've lived a life and are still standing, despite years and challenges ....

Tabor said...

I think that ruins are hard to capture. You have done a really nice job. I have taken pictures of some and then been disappointed by not capturing the magnificence or the romance that I saw. My photos just end up looking old!

SilverNeurotic said...

One of my favorite places to photograph is the Eastern State Penetentary in Philadelphia. Your shots reminded me of it, though, mind were taken on a rainy, overcast day so the place looked 10 times creepier than normal.

Johanna GGG said...

gorgeous keyhole photos - and so appropriate for the ruins which are merely a keyhole view into another world but you know there is so much more there than you can see

Kazzy said...

Such great shots! I am a sucker for these old buildings.

Jenny Woolf said...

I've always liked ruins too. But, I joined the SPAB and the Victorian Society when I was in my teens because I also hated to see those ruins bulldozed or "modernised" by unsympathetic tarting up, as so often happened.

Now I have transferred many of the feelings I had for ruins, onto historic interiors, with battered old woodwork and peculiar latches and weird layouts. These are less spectacular but more interesting than larger structures, and often just as interesting. But so often interiors are ripped out and sanitised, losing all the historical information and unique character and turning the house (or shop) into a shell.

What is worse, this kind of architectural vandalism is still widely admired. I often read articles in home improvement magazines explaining how some vandal has "opened up" an ancient cottage interior so that it is "light bright and spacious" and painted it all in Farrow and Ball, blah blah yawn.

The National Trust is doing its best not to be so sanitised these days, I think - I visited Calke Abbey recently and that was great.

But....oh well, I should write an article on this, rather than filling up your blog comment space! But thanks for the post - and I love your photos.

becky said...

Oh, these are lovely pictures! Ancient elegance and your framing is wonderful.

Rachel said...

I particularly like the last one, with a whole series of doorways going off into the distance...

ladyfi said...

Wow - such amazingly wonderful framed shots! Gorgeous!

Chef E said...

I once thought about publishing a book on door and window frames, like a coffee table book, but I do not travel enough and did not have a great camera for the longest...you could do it, and I would buy it!

BECKY said...

Beautiful! Thanks for sharing!

Rabbit Hole Report said...

What a delightful photographic and cultural lesson, Rachel!

christine said...

It's true - Rachel always preferred English Heritae sites to National Trust houses - there was always a compromise to be negotiated on which property to visit. Of course, properties with roofs were always preferable if it was raining (not, of course, that it ever rained on those long summer days when we were camping, oh no!!!)

nina kuriloff said...

These photographs are truly marvelous!

Post a Comment

Thanks for dropping in! I'd love to hear what you have to say, and if you leave a URL, I'll be round to visit you soon. (Comment moderation is on because the spam has become overwhelming!)

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...